P2 – Panel – Beyond Corruption: How to Foster Human Rights’ Protection through Anti-corruption Regulation in Developing Economies

Panel Title:

(P2) Beyond Corruption: How to Foster Human Rights’ Protection through Anti-corruption Regulation in Developing Economies

Chair(s):

Eduardo Saad-Diniz, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Law, Ribeirão Preto Law School, University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil

Julia Gracia, Ph.D. Candidate, NOVA Law School (Lisbon), Portugal; Research Fellow, Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia, Portugal; Researcher, CEDIS, Portugal


Panel Descriptions:

The panel aims to promote discussions about emerging trends in regulatory governance that can effectively foster human rights’ protection in developing economies. Despite having drawn scholarly attention worldwide, studies in the field still demand better metrics and innovative solutions to go beyond the common sense of fighting corruption. Globally, the current legal and regulatory framework of anti-corruption is mainly focused on enhancing governance, risk avoidance, and compliance measures to prevent corruption. There is still nothing much about the possible links between corruption, democracy, and human rights.

The connection between the lack of human rights protection and corruption is evident in developing countries, where modern forms of systemic corruption are somehow prevalent. Missing are, though, reliable measures on the relationship between corruption, inequality, poverty, and development that could impact human rights violations.

The panel seeks to explore possible examples of failures and success of anti-corruption regulation in developing economies and how they correlate with the protection of human rights. We strongly incentivize empirical work and papers that address possible networks of governance and international cooperation that could help foster human rights employing anti-corruption regulation.

Possible themes:

  • Empirical studies addressing metrics and innovative solutions connecting corruption, democracy, and human rights;
  • Theoretical or empirical research on the possible impact of anti-corruption regulation on human rights;
  • Studies on the relationship between corruption, inequality, poverty, and development that could impact human rights violations, with a connection to regulatory governance or regulation;
  • Evidence of the deterrent effect, or its deficit, resulting from strengthening the enforcement of anti-corruption regulation, as well as means and alternative strategies to hold accountable companies.

Discussion method: We seek interaction and feedback. Each paper should have one discussant from the panel participants. After 10min presentation, the discussant previously assigned will spend approximately two to five minutes making a few initial, constructive comments on the paper and ask one or two questions before the chair opens to questions from the other panel members and the audience.

Panel Formats:

Traditional Approach

 

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